[MyL5] Australia/New Zealand

A standards-compliant one? :wink: It shouldn’t matter, right?

It was a really old Bluetooth 2.0 keyboard that I had lying around.

Logitech.

It is an interesting compromise between

a) sshing in from a regular computer with a full-size normal keyboard, and
b) using the on-screen keyboard.

Tab for ‘completion’ is certainly a lot faster and easier than using the on-screen keyboard. So if you are doing a lot of work in a shell, it is nicer.

One thing I should mention: The Librem 5 gave questionable information about the battery level of the Bluetooth keyboard, reporting it as ‘almost flat’ when I just charged it up fully before doing any testing. However before testing this keyboard with the phone, I tested it with a regular computer and the regular computer gave the same message. So either the keyboard’s battery condition is shot (possible since the keyboard has been sitting around doing nothing for some years) or this is a Linux problem in common.

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Today I tested … disk read speed on the two disks.

Speeds were surprisingly slow, 28 MB/sec on the eMMC drive and 7 MB/sec on the uSD card. :frowning:

Does make me wonder how well it would go recording video, once the camera is working. For me though I am not that interested in video, much more still images. So I can live with it.

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Today I tested … java

I tested one command line application and one GUI application.

The command line application was a little slow to start but ran normally.

The GUI application was basically unusable. It works normally on desktop Linux (and on Microsoft Windows). On the Librem 5 the main window doesn’t come up - just remains blank. So no GUI controls are usable. However, where keyboard shortcuts exist, the application responds to those, but still doesn’t work.

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Today I tested … time between charges.

With Bluetooth, WiFi and the modem on - but the screen mostly off - and sshd in - with a couple of apps running - all doing “not much” … 8 hours 55 minutes before it shut down in a controlled fashion. This should be a fair indication of “standby” time (providing that Bluetooth, WiFi and modem all on is representative of how you use the phone).

The “low battery” notification came at 10%. The “critically low battery” notification came at 2% - and within a few minutes of that it shut down.

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i wouldn’t make a habit of letting the battery reach such a low depletion state … but perhaps the firmware accounts for that and leaves some spare room … at least that’s how i remember it being by reading some OLD posts here on the Purism forum …

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Normally I wouldn’t. Due to habit with my existing phone I expect I would put it on charge at 20%.

It is however difficult to avoid the occasional shut down due to low power unless you can watch the phone like a hawk.

perhaps the issue would be partially mitigated by having an audio alarm system ON that says “help ! i’m dying !”

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Oooh… that’t a good point: what kind of warnings are there and can user set them? How - GUI or edit a file? Something different than normal messages? Other actions possible/recommended when certain limit reached?

Blue light comes on because of the notification. However that is not distinguishable from any other notification (new SMS, new email) without pressing the wake/sleep button to activate the screen, at which point it will be obvious that power is low.

For the time being, I am happier for development resources to be expended on increasing the time-between-charges rather than on fancier notifications.

However since it is open source, go your hardest. At the very least, I think it would be easy enough to run a cron job every 10 minutes and if battery is at or below 10% then it will play @reC’s message or something less melodramatic, since you might be in a business meeting. LOL. Also, I don’t want to get emergency services involved. :slight_smile: I might try this later …

Wow, that’s old school! Years ago my partner at the time had a Palm PDA that did that. One evening we heard a strange electronic shrieking noise that we hadn’t heard before, and it was the Palm running out of juice. We joked that it was like looking after a tamagotchi , which were also cool gadgets at the time :grin:

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Today I tested … Telstra

Country: Australia
Provider: Telstra
Modem: BM818-T1
Calls: in and out, OK
SMS: in and out, OK
Data: OK (slow)

SIM already activated in another phone. SIM moved temporarily into the Librem 5.

Various APNs offered but this time I was smart enough to check the APN on the original phone before removing the SIM, so I knew to choose telstra.internet, which was one of the APNs offered.

If only I knew how to see which LTE band is being used for data. However it should be using B28 (the band that is missing on the -E1 and -A1 variants).

@amosbatto

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Seems to work well enough. There were a few hurdles to overcome (like the fact that I don’t really know what I’m doing) but the internet had most of the answers.

I do wonder what will happen if I were on a call when the battery became ‘low’.

well, joke aside … the L5 simply needs to play the “Help ! I’m dying !” message in a MORSE code audio signal. how ? beep-beep beep-beep-beep beep beep beep-freaking beep … in a loop until it annoys everybody involved so much that they say “put it out of it’s misery already !”


:slightly_smiling_face:

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Might be I’m catching what you are looking for. Try to drive what you need like this (as used from my side under Mobian, but it is actually just about how GNOME Settings are structured anyway):

Settings / Power, and there are three soft-switches that might be preferred to be used on daily basis / current needs (after within above mentioned option you enabled Mobile Data and, if needed, Data Roaming).

@irvinewade, I added your info to the wiki. Thanks.

I don’t know how to see the exact band which is being used. We discussed this in another thread. Unfortunately, BroadMobi doesn’t publish its documentation. Maybe someone can find this info in the code of the driver. I haven’t looked.

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Today I tested … shortening the unlock PIN.

If I recall correctly, changing the PIN via Settings / Details / Users enforces a minimum length of 6, which doesn’t really work for me, particularly while I am stuffing around a lot.

From root, setting the PIN with passwd purism seemed to do the trick. I didn’t even have to reboot for the lock screen to pick up the new, shorter PIN.

I did take a copy of /etc/shadow before doing this, just in case … :wink:


My battery warning script does not seem to be working after all. :frowning: Works when run interactively from an ssh shell. Does not work when run from cron. When run from cron gives

aplay: pcm_write:2053: write error: Input/output error

(I’m using the aplay command to play a WAV file.)

It is the same user executing the script either way.

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Hi, I am about to order a Librem phone from Aus. Can you tell me what the option for “Modem” is or should be? Sorry I am very un techy. Also what is the wait time appox?
Cheers

BM818-T1

Tested OK for calls / text / data on Vodafone’s network and on Telstra’s network. I haven’t got around to testing on Optus’s network yet, although I am not expecting problems.

I don’t really know. Not short. The answer may become clearer in a week or so. Purism has to clear a global backlog of, I would suppose, thousands of phones.

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Thanks Irvine,
I will order the phone and look forward to its arrival.
Cheers Gerzy

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